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Earth 2 #1 Variant Cover…
I know there must be plenty of people who have already put this up for Tumblr-viewing pleasure, but I feel obliged to comment after someone pointed something out. Earth 2 Batman is using escrima sticks.
Did Dick Grayson get to stay on as Batman in some form after all? (and then, is that Conner and Donna instead of Clark and Diana?) Or is such a thing too awesome to be true?
Anyway, James Robinson has already said his core team for the JSA will be Alan, Jay and Ted so I’m quite curious as to how this first issue will actually transpire…

Earth 2 #1 Variant Cover…

I know there must be plenty of people who have already put this up for Tumblr-viewing pleasure, but I feel obliged to comment after someone pointed something out. Earth 2 Batman is using escrima sticks.

Did Dick Grayson get to stay on as Batman in some form after all? (and then, is that Conner and Donna instead of Clark and Diana?) Or is such a thing too awesome to be true?

Anyway, James Robinson has already said his core team for the JSA will be Alan, Jay and Ted so I’m quite curious as to how this first issue will actually transpire…

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(Source: notthiscrap)

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(Source: dknight12)

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And in Justice League #5, we discover where Batman got “My parents are deeeeeeaaaaaad” from.

Goddamnit Hal.

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Teen Titans today…
…was really good, highlights  being Bunker beating on Superboy, Red  Robin beating on Superboy, and  Solstice’s little speech to Superboy  (I’m making it seem like he lost to  anyone who hasn’t read the issue,  uh, but he kept getting back up. You  know, Kryptonian body and all  that. That said, I did like how there was  an element of subtlety to the  battle- each Titan did some damage on  their own, but they never really  worked together because they’re just  not used to each other or  understand each other’s powers that well,  hence why they got taken down  by Superboy, who has been spending a lot  of time getting to grips with  his abilities).
That said, there were a couple misspellings, one of them pretty   noticeable because the word was bolded. I can’t help but think that if the   editor spent more time actually editing rather than finding places to   put in those annoying editor notes (“Chastising Chase!” -argh, stop   breaking story immersion, would you?-), that problem could be easily   resolved.
Well, I say that, but I don’t recall any notes in this issue. Maybe   there was no editing this issue and that’s why there were no notes, or   checking the text for errors.
Well, hopefully they’ll correct them when the issues are collected for the trade.

EDIT: I’ve since been reminded that grift means con or theft, hence that one wasn’t a misspelling. Although Solstice was spelt as Soltice at one point.

Teen Titans today…

…was really good, highlights being Bunker beating on Superboy, Red Robin beating on Superboy, and Solstice’s little speech to Superboy (I’m making it seem like he lost to anyone who hasn’t read the issue, uh, but he kept getting back up. You know, Kryptonian body and all that. That said, I did like how there was an element of subtlety to the battle- each Titan did some damage on their own, but they never really worked together because they’re just not used to each other or understand each other’s powers that well, hence why they got taken down by Superboy, who has been spending a lot of time getting to grips with his abilities).

That said, there were a couple misspellings, one of them pretty noticeable because the word was bolded. I can’t help but think that if the editor spent more time actually editing rather than finding places to put in those annoying editor notes (“Chastising Chase!” -argh, stop breaking story immersion, would you?-), that problem could be easily resolved.

Well, I say that, but I don’t recall any notes in this issue. Maybe there was no editing this issue and that’s why there were no notes, or checking the text for errors.

Well, hopefully they’ll correct them when the issues are collected for the trade.

EDIT: I’ve since been reminded that grift means con or theft, hence that one wasn’t a misspelling. Although Solstice was spelt as Soltice at one point.

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Batman #5 Preview

Here: http://www.ew.com/ew/special/0„20560603,00.html

Cameos like crazy. Dick, Damian, Selina, Barbara, David…

EDIT: Fixed the link after I realised I linked to the third page and not the first.

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Batman and Robin #5 was pretty good.

Finally we could see into Bruce’s head about the whole situation (a proper look, rather than those couple pages back in #2).

And the whole comparison of Damian to Morgan, who killed his assassin mother because she would’ve killed his father, who he respected and loved more than his mother even though he knew here for longer… yeah, I see what you’re doing here, Mr Tomasi.

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Batman #5 teaser, for anyone who hasn’t seen it.
Love the owl fountain.

Batman #5 teaser, for anyone who hasn’t seen it.

Love the owl fountain.

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whateverilikeandmore:

It started in September and I’m excited until now!! Is that possible?

(( Comic: DC Comics - The New 52 ))

(via theresnoherolikehim-deactivated)

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whateverilikeandmore:

DC’s The New 52 Characters in Young Justice Style — It’s amazing!!

If there’s one flaw, there’s not enough characters. :P

whateverilikeandmore:

DC’s The New 52 Characters in Young Justice Style — It’s amazing!!

If there’s one flaw, there’s not enough characters. :P

(via theresnoherolikehim-deactivated)

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An scene from an upcoming Batman issue, Dick Grayson and Damian Wayne are back together again.
Who can’t fucking wait?

An scene from an upcoming Batman issue, Dick Grayson and Damian Wayne are back together again.

Who can’t fucking wait?

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Batman #2
"Beware the Court of Owls, 
That watches all the time,
Ruling Gotham from a shadowed perch,
Behind granite and lime,
They watch you at your hearth, 
They watch you at your bed,
Speak not a whispered word of them,
Or they’ll send the Talon for your head.”
Well Jesus Christ, this is a comic where I don’t know what to say.  Why? It’s so fucking awesome that there really aren’t many words to  describe it. Scott Snyder has sown the seeds for a series with the  potential to topple his run on Detective Comics. Some people have  started complaining about his habit of including the superhero’s habitat  as a main ingredient in their stories, but I love it. Gotham City has  started feeling alive to me after The Black Mirror and Gates of Gotham, and it really wants to chew up Bats here.
Bruce is brimming with overconfidence, and you can feel its really  going to come back to bite him hard. For once, he’s actually being the  one to limit himself, his claiming of Gotham means the city’s pushing  even harder to shatter his confidence.
The story opens with some narration with Bruce talking about the  iconic Wayne Tower of Gotham and its twelve gargoyles, or guardians. He  then talks about the observation deck, the glass of which is  unbreakable- till he goes flying out of it with throwing knives lodged  in his arteries. The pain and blood is too much for him to move,  and the last of his thoughts is him commenting its impossible to do  anything other than fall… and then we cut to 24 hours earlier.
A  damaged helicopter carrying a bunch of crooks and kidnapped women is  moving just over the train tracks, having been damaged somewhat by an  earlier skirmish with Bats, who is chasing them. Bats having damaged  their helicopter too much for it to go any faster, they decide to start  lugging the women out of the chopper, and one goes into the back to  start- and a hand bursts through the window, pulling the guy halfway  out.
Batman rides the Batcycle along the train tracks- only to  suddenly stop pulling the guy and instead speeds on ahead. And then an  approaching train appears, which the Batcycle jumps onto. As the  oncoming train speeds towards the helicopter which is just above it- the  Batcycle crashes through the windows.
There’s a lot of glass breaking in this issue, if the past few paragraphs didn’t clue you in.
We  then cut to an autopsy for the victim of last issue. Through cameras  and scanners, Bats is joining the autopsy from the Batcave with a  virtual body appearing before him. On his wisdom tooth, Bats and Gordan discover the same  emblem as was on the knives used to kill him. Batman calls it an  Athenian owl, a symbol of wealth and power in Ancient Greece, but Gordan  is convinced it’s something a little closer to home, reciting the  Gotham children’s rhyme, something Batman simply refers to as simple  legends.
As Gordan asks about the tissue that was beneath the  fingernails of the victim, he says forensics came back empty-handed.  Bats says he’ll look into it, as Nightwing appears. Dick is initially quite impressed about the scanners set up in  the morgue, although he says Bats will miss having to go through the  ventilation shafts to sneak into that place. 
Bruce, all business,  just tells him about the victim who had his DNA under his fingernails,  and it’s revealed that the Bat-family’s DNA is kept protected, hence why  Gordan’s forensics couldn’t find anything. Nightwing identifies  the victim, who about a week ago, met him at a public event. The man  grabbed onto his arm, babbling about how they’re real, they’re  everywhere, and how they’re sending him for all of you. He offers to  show Bruce the scratchmarks still left in his arm as a result of  security dragging the clinging man away.
Batman says that’s  enough, and Nightwing just realises Bruce probably just checked the  footage beforehand and already knows his alibi. Bats says “You know me  better than anyone, except perhaps for Alfred… of course I checked the  surveillance footage.” While that’s what he says, his body language  seemed a bit off. I kinda got the impression he was lying, and had  instead chosen to take Dick’s words as truth because he trusts him so  much.
We then cut forward, as Bruce Wayne is stepping out of the  lift into the being-renovated Old Wayne Tower, having had a meeting with  Lincoln March. Bruce offers a donation, but March states he’s actually  after his vote rather than his money. March then also talks about how he  also lost his parents young, and how the strange details stay with him,  like a ceramic pin his mother was wearing (if you need me to point out  the parallel, you haven’t been reading Batman comics that long, *cough*  pearls *cough*). March then talks about Gotham saved him after his  parents’ deaths, and how he sees Bruce as a genuine ally- and then the  conversation changes mood when he talks about an old evil having  returned to Gotham.
As Bruce asks him what he means, a wounded  guard falls out of the lift, revealing the arrival of a strange assassin  with an owl motif. March starts talking, but gets a throwing knife  through him for his troubles, and then the assassin (who’s believed to  be called Talon) raises his knife towards Bruce.
At first Bruce  tries to restrain himself, going for moves that look like lucky strikes,  but as he gets a knife through his arm, he changes tact and tries to  choke the guy.
Fun fact: It takes eleven pounds of pressure to collapse a windpipe.
Fun fact II: Bruce is applying over a hundred to Talon, who’s not even affected in the slightest.
Bruce’s  thoughts is that the guy must be on something like Venom when Talon  cuts his way lose and states the Court of Owls have sentenced him to  die. He kicks Bruce out of the window, and he misses the first lot of  guardians he mentioned, and also states he’ll be at terminal velocity by  the time he reaches the second.
Talon joins him in falling out of  the window, and after commenting “How I love killing Waynes”, the two  fight in mid-air. 
I’m not going to spoil the ending, it’s that awesome.
Batman has cemented itself as the best of the current New 52, and if  you’re not reading it, pick it up. You won’t be disappointed.

Batman #2

"Beware the Court of Owls,

That watches all the time,

Ruling Gotham from a shadowed perch,

Behind granite and lime,

They watch you at your hearth,

They watch you at your bed,

Speak not a whispered word of them,

Or they’ll send the Talon for your head.”

Well Jesus Christ, this is a comic where I don’t know what to say. Why? It’s so fucking awesome that there really aren’t many words to describe it. Scott Snyder has sown the seeds for a series with the potential to topple his run on Detective Comics. Some people have started complaining about his habit of including the superhero’s habitat as a main ingredient in their stories, but I love it. Gotham City has started feeling alive to me after The Black Mirror and Gates of Gotham, and it really wants to chew up Bats here.

Bruce is brimming with overconfidence, and you can feel its really going to come back to bite him hard. For once, he’s actually being the one to limit himself, his claiming of Gotham means the city’s pushing even harder to shatter his confidence.

The story opens with some narration with Bruce talking about the iconic Wayne Tower of Gotham and its twelve gargoyles, or guardians. He then talks about the observation deck, the glass of which is unbreakable- till he goes flying out of it with throwing knives lodged in his arteries. The pain and blood is too much for him to move, and the last of his thoughts is him commenting its impossible to do anything other than fall… and then we cut to 24 hours earlier.

A damaged helicopter carrying a bunch of crooks and kidnapped women is moving just over the train tracks, having been damaged somewhat by an earlier skirmish with Bats, who is chasing them. Bats having damaged their helicopter too much for it to go any faster, they decide to start lugging the women out of the chopper, and one goes into the back to start- and a hand bursts through the window, pulling the guy halfway out.

Batman rides the Batcycle along the train tracks- only to suddenly stop pulling the guy and instead speeds on ahead. And then an approaching train appears, which the Batcycle jumps onto. As the oncoming train speeds towards the helicopter which is just above it- the Batcycle crashes through the windows.

There’s a lot of glass breaking in this issue, if the past few paragraphs didn’t clue you in.

We then cut to an autopsy for the victim of last issue. Through cameras and scanners, Bats is joining the autopsy from the Batcave with a virtual body appearing before him. On his wisdom tooth, Bats and Gordan discover the same emblem as was on the knives used to kill him. Batman calls it an Athenian owl, a symbol of wealth and power in Ancient Greece, but Gordan is convinced it’s something a little closer to home, reciting the Gotham children’s rhyme, something Batman simply refers to as simple legends.

As Gordan asks about the tissue that was beneath the fingernails of the victim, he says forensics came back empty-handed. Bats says he’ll look into it, as Nightwing appears. Dick is initially quite impressed about the scanners set up in the morgue, although he says Bats will miss having to go through the ventilation shafts to sneak into that place. 

Bruce, all business, just tells him about the victim who had his DNA under his fingernails, and it’s revealed that the Bat-family’s DNA is kept protected, hence why Gordan’s forensics couldn’t find anything. Nightwing identifies the victim, who about a week ago, met him at a public event. The man grabbed onto his arm, babbling about how they’re real, they’re everywhere, and how they’re sending him for all of you. He offers to show Bruce the scratchmarks still left in his arm as a result of security dragging the clinging man away.

Batman says that’s enough, and Nightwing just realises Bruce probably just checked the footage beforehand and already knows his alibi. Bats says “You know me better than anyone, except perhaps for Alfred… of course I checked the surveillance footage.” While that’s what he says, his body language seemed a bit off. I kinda got the impression he was lying, and had instead chosen to take Dick’s words as truth because he trusts him so much.

We then cut forward, as Bruce Wayne is stepping out of the lift into the being-renovated Old Wayne Tower, having had a meeting with Lincoln March. Bruce offers a donation, but March states he’s actually after his vote rather than his money. March then also talks about how he also lost his parents young, and how the strange details stay with him, like a ceramic pin his mother was wearing (if you need me to point out the parallel, you haven’t been reading Batman comics that long, *cough* pearls *cough*). March then talks about Gotham saved him after his parents’ deaths, and how he sees Bruce as a genuine ally- and then the conversation changes mood when he talks about an old evil having returned to Gotham.

As Bruce asks him what he means, a wounded guard falls out of the lift, revealing the arrival of a strange assassin with an owl motif. March starts talking, but gets a throwing knife through him for his troubles, and then the assassin (who’s believed to be called Talon) raises his knife towards Bruce.

At first Bruce tries to restrain himself, going for moves that look like lucky strikes, but as he gets a knife through his arm, he changes tact and tries to choke the guy.

Fun fact: It takes eleven pounds of pressure to collapse a windpipe.

Fun fact II: Bruce is applying over a hundred to Talon, who’s not even affected in the slightest.

Bruce’s thoughts is that the guy must be on something like Venom when Talon cuts his way lose and states the Court of Owls have sentenced him to die. He kicks Bruce out of the window, and he misses the first lot of guardians he mentioned, and also states he’ll be at terminal velocity by the time he reaches the second.

Talon joins him in falling out of the window, and after commenting “How I love killing Waynes”, the two fight in mid-air. 

I’m not going to spoil the ending, it’s that awesome.

Batman has cemented itself as the best of the current New 52, and if you’re not reading it, pick it up. You won’t be disappointed.

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Justice League #2
Batman: “You sound like a cop.”
Flash: “I am. I work in the crime lab.”
Green Lantern: “Barry, you’re exposing your identity!”
Flash: “And you just called me “Barry”, genius.”
That exchange sums up perfectly why Justice League is one of the funnest comic series of the New 52. Some people complained about JL#1 because they felt it was underwhelming for the flagship title of the relaunch, but they’re missing the point. This isn’t supposed to be a Morrison epic or a Moore masterpiece, but just what comics are at their core, entertaining stories.
The story surprisingly, doesn’t pick up straight away where it left off, instead taking us to Central City, giving us Barry in civilian garb, arguing with his boss about not being able to investigate this murder because everyone’s being forced to work on uncovering the identity of The Flash. We then pick up back with Bats and GL, evidently five/ten minutes or so after the ending of last issue, as Bats himself is already out of tricks to dealing with Supes.
Superman pretty much is beating the everloving crap out of Bats and Hal, at which point we discover Hal’s already familiar with Barry, and is quick to call him up and ask for help. After a short argument which mainly consists of Barry berating Hal, he shows up in a second, and sends Superman flying.
Flash then takes his time to show up Superman, even sticking his cape over his head, until Supes punches with his all might- then misses by an inch. He then flicks out his finger and sends poor Barry to crash into a hot dog cart.
With that distraction, Bats finally gets Supes and GL to calm the fuck down and explains the situation, also showing that they discovered one of the weird alien cube things, as the law arrive on the scene.
The four slip away into the sewers, while we discover another cube has been obtained by Dr Stone (Vic’s dad) and is currently being examined in S.T.A.R. Labs. Vic shows up on the scene, upset his dad missed his game again, especially considering the talent scouts and offers for full scholarships, and eventually Dr Stone snaps at his son, saying that the birth of superhumans make humans and their physical prowess obsolete and calls sports a joke.
Meanwhile, back with our rag-tag Justice League, Bats and Supes are discussing superhero bases while Hal considers forming a duo with Barry before they go back to discussing the cube. After some banter, the cubes start reacting, and explode, releasing a wave of energy and a portal that releases armies of the creature seen from JL#1, which scream Darkseid’s name.
Victor is caught in the energy blast and our last page shows him being engulfed as his dad screams his name. We’re also promised Wonder Woman in the next issue.
And I really enjoyed it.
The superheroes banter and interactions is really what makes this series. You’d think it’s all been done to death by now, especially the Superman/Batman fight (which I applaud for just showing Supes beat the crap out of Bats when most occasions seem to bizarrely go the other way), but it’s really funny and entertaining.
Art is gorgeous as expected of Jim Lee, and as for the characters, they’re almost over-the-top in how great they are. Each of them are really overconfident and almost arrogant- apart from Bats who quickly changes tact after getting his arse kicked by Superman, hence why he’s able to calm them down and give orders- as if they’re so used to being solo heroes that the idea of sharing the spotlight is absurd to them. And it’s really amusing to watch.
Since this takes place pretty soon after Action Comics, Superman is still acting quite a bit like his depiction by Grant Morrison. And it’s completely awesome. Batman is the voice of cold clever reason, as he says when Flash asks what can he do, he states he can “keep us on point”. Green Lantern is a bit meatheaded, and complains about Bats a lot, while Flash has to be the more level-headed of the two. As for Vic, well, honestly, I don’t really care about Cyborg and am still upset they got rid of Martian Manhunter for the League, so I’m still awaiting WW’s and Aquaman’s appearances. A princess and a king to add to the massive egos already displayed.
Can’t wait. ^ ^

Justice League #2

Batman: “You sound like a cop.”

Flash: “I am. I work in the crime lab.”

Green Lantern: “Barry, you’re exposing your identity!”

Flash: “And you just called me “Barry”, genius.”

That exchange sums up perfectly why Justice League is one of the funnest comic series of the New 52. Some people complained about JL#1 because they felt it was underwhelming for the flagship title of the relaunch, but they’re missing the point. This isn’t supposed to be a Morrison epic or a Moore masterpiece, but just what comics are at their core, entertaining stories.

The story surprisingly, doesn’t pick up straight away where it left off, instead taking us to Central City, giving us Barry in civilian garb, arguing with his boss about not being able to investigate this murder because everyone’s being forced to work on uncovering the identity of The Flash. We then pick up back with Bats and GL, evidently five/ten minutes or so after the ending of last issue, as Bats himself is already out of tricks to dealing with Supes.

Superman pretty much is beating the everloving crap out of Bats and Hal, at which point we discover Hal’s already familiar with Barry, and is quick to call him up and ask for help. After a short argument which mainly consists of Barry berating Hal, he shows up in a second, and sends Superman flying.

Flash then takes his time to show up Superman, even sticking his cape over his head, until Supes punches with his all might- then misses by an inch. He then flicks out his finger and sends poor Barry to crash into a hot dog cart.

With that distraction, Bats finally gets Supes and GL to calm the fuck down and explains the situation, also showing that they discovered one of the weird alien cube things, as the law arrive on the scene.

The four slip away into the sewers, while we discover another cube has been obtained by Dr Stone (Vic’s dad) and is currently being examined in S.T.A.R. Labs. Vic shows up on the scene, upset his dad missed his game again, especially considering the talent scouts and offers for full scholarships, and eventually Dr Stone snaps at his son, saying that the birth of superhumans make humans and their physical prowess obsolete and calls sports a joke.

Meanwhile, back with our rag-tag Justice League, Bats and Supes are discussing superhero bases while Hal considers forming a duo with Barry before they go back to discussing the cube. After some banter, the cubes start reacting, and explode, releasing a wave of energy and a portal that releases armies of the creature seen from JL#1, which scream Darkseid’s name.

Victor is caught in the energy blast and our last page shows him being engulfed as his dad screams his name. We’re also promised Wonder Woman in the next issue.

And I really enjoyed it.

The superheroes banter and interactions is really what makes this series. You’d think it’s all been done to death by now, especially the Superman/Batman fight (which I applaud for just showing Supes beat the crap out of Bats when most occasions seem to bizarrely go the other way), but it’s really funny and entertaining.

Art is gorgeous as expected of Jim Lee, and as for the characters, they’re almost over-the-top in how great they are. Each of them are really overconfident and almost arrogant- apart from Bats who quickly changes tact after getting his arse kicked by Superman, hence why he’s able to calm them down and give orders- as if they’re so used to being solo heroes that the idea of sharing the spotlight is absurd to them. And it’s really amusing to watch.

Since this takes place pretty soon after Action Comics, Superman is still acting quite a bit like his depiction by Grant Morrison. And it’s completely awesome. Batman is the voice of cold clever reason, as he says when Flash asks what can he do, he states he can “keep us on point”. Green Lantern is a bit meatheaded, and complains about Bats a lot, while Flash has to be the more level-headed of the two. As for Vic, well, honestly, I don’t really care about Cyborg and am still upset they got rid of Martian Manhunter for the League, so I’m still awaiting WW’s and Aquaman’s appearances. A princess and a king to add to the massive egos already displayed.

Can’t wait. ^ ^

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earth719:

 

Detective Comics #1 and Action Comics #1 start the timeline in my mind. We know Detective Comics is relatively ten years before the modern day. Action Comics has been argued to be five years before, but based on the Justice League being five years prior, and Superman having all his powers and armor in Justice League, Action Comics must have come first, hence I put it at ten years with Detective.

Your timeline’s all wrong.

Detective is taking place in the present day. The writer has actually come out and said it. Hence why there was no “five/ten years ago” in it.

Action Comics is taking place five years ago, not because it’s been “argued” to, but because the writers have actually said it’s taking place five years ago.

There’s just a time difference of months between Action Comics and Justice League. Not years.

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Detective Comics #2, sucking so you don’t have to.
I’ll sum up the entire storyline for you. I’d call it spoilers, but considering most of this feels pointless, I won’t.
Bruce Wayne is rock-climbing. In his office. Er, yeah. Then some other businessman joins him rock-climbing. Then Bruce goes to have sexy time with a reporter, then goes on a bike-ride through Gotham, meeting up with Gordon and goes somewhere else, where he’s led into a trap and Gordon is also trapped or something. Then Bruce encounters our new villain, the Dollmaker and his gang who appear to be his family (of course) and is presented with a Gordon who has had parts of his face cut off and new skin stitched on (which might turn out to be a fake).
So Joker got it last issue, Gordon this new one, who’s getting it next?
But first, let’s address the completely original Batman villain, The Dollmaker, which of course sounds nothing like the Puppeteer. He has his own themed-gang which of course has never happened before, or a gang that are family or treat him like family, which is also completely new. Plus, his trademark of mutilating faces hasn’t been seen in a Batman comic for years… not counting Professor Pyg who also did the same thing by giving people new faces… or Flamingo, who skinned and ate faces… er, yeah, let’s stop here.
Let’s move onto the great detective work done in this issue. After all, it is Detective Comics, and there certainly is a great detective in it. His name is James Gordan. Because all Batman did was meet up with him, overhear a location and go, while Gordan did all the hard work, collecting files (or telling Bullock to do that for him), checking surveillance, recognising crooks, etc, etc.
Admittedly, I am being too harsh so I’ll refrain from going into further detail. Honestly, it’s a mediocre tale with fairly nice art, pretending to be some sort of classic Batman noir story. Honestly though, if you really want a Bat-title from this week, drop this and go for Batwing. 

Detective Comics #2, sucking so you don’t have to.

I’ll sum up the entire storyline for you. I’d call it spoilers, but considering most of this feels pointless, I won’t.

Bruce Wayne is rock-climbing. In his office. Er, yeah. Then some other businessman joins him rock-climbing. Then Bruce goes to have sexy time with a reporter, then goes on a bike-ride through Gotham, meeting up with Gordon and goes somewhere else, where he’s led into a trap and Gordon is also trapped or something. Then Bruce encounters our new villain, the Dollmaker and his gang who appear to be his family (of course) and is presented with a Gordon who has had parts of his face cut off and new skin stitched on (which might turn out to be a fake).

So Joker got it last issue, Gordon this new one, who’s getting it next?

But first, let’s address the completely original Batman villain, The Dollmaker, which of course sounds nothing like the Puppeteer. He has his own themed-gang which of course has never happened before, or a gang that are family or treat him like family, which is also completely new. Plus, his trademark of mutilating faces hasn’t been seen in a Batman comic for years… not counting Professor Pyg who also did the same thing by giving people new faces… or Flamingo, who skinned and ate faces… er, yeah, let’s stop here.

Let’s move onto the great detective work done in this issue. After all, it is Detective Comics, and there certainly is a great detective in it. His name is James Gordan. Because all Batman did was meet up with him, overhear a location and go, while Gordan did all the hard work, collecting files (or telling Bullock to do that for him), checking surveillance, recognising crooks, etc, etc.

Admittedly, I am being too harsh so I’ll refrain from going into further detail. Honestly, it’s a mediocre tale with fairly nice art, pretending to be some sort of classic Batman noir story. Honestly though, if you really want a Bat-title from this week, drop this and go for Batwing.